Proper

Proper may refer to:

  • Proper (liturgy), the part of a Christian liturgy that is specific to the date within the Liturgical Year
  • Proper frame, such system of reference in which object is stationary (non moving), sometimes also called a co-moving frame
  • Proper (heraldry), in heraldry, means depicted in natural colors
  • Proper or appropriate conduct
  • Proper (often capitalized PROPER), a corrected release in response to a previously released online video or movie that contains transcoding or other playback errors.

In mathematics:

  • Proper map, in topology, a property of continuous function between topological spaces, if inverse images of compact subsets are compact
  • Proper morphism, in algebraic geometry, an analogue of a proper map for algebraic varieties
  • Proper transfer function, a transfer function in control theory in which the degree of the numerator does not exceed the degree of the denominator
  • Proper equilibrium, in game theory, a refinement of the Nash equilibrium.
  • Proper subset
  • Proper space

Famous quotes containing the word proper:

    Anyone, however, who has had dealings with dates knows that they are worse than elusive, they are perverse. Events do not happen at the right time, nor in their proper sequence. That sense of harmony with place and season which is so stong in the historian—if he be a readable historian—is lamentably lacking in history, which takes no pains to verify his most convincing statements.
    Agnes Repplier (1858–1950)

    He never does a proper thing without giving an improper reason for it.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    I thought it altogether proper that I should take a brief furlough from official duties at Washington to mingle with you here to-day as a comrade, because every President of the United States must realize that the strength of the Government, its defence in war, the army that is to muster under its banner when our Nation is assailed, is to be found here in the masses of our people.
    Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)