Politics of Yukon

Politics Of Yukon

Yukon /ˈjuːkɒn/ is the westernmost and smallest of Canada's three federal territories. Whitehorse is the territorial capital.

The territory was split from the Hudson's Bay Company's North-Western Territory in 1898. Receiving royal assent on March 27, 2002, the federal government modernized the Yukon Act to confirm "Yukon", rather than "Yukon Territory", as the current usage standard. Though officially bilingual (English and French), the Yukon Government also recognizes First Nations languages.

At 5,959 m (19,551 ft), Yukon's Mount Logan, in Kluane National Park and Reserve, is the highest mountain in Canada and the second-highest on the North American continent (after Denali in the U.S. state of Alaska). The territory's climate is Arctic in the north (north of Old Crow), subarctic in the central region, between north of Whitehorse and Old Crow, and has a humid continental climate in the far south, south of Whitehorse and in areas close to the British Columbia border.

Read more about Politics Of Yukon:  Etymology, Geography, History, Economy, Government and Politics, Transportation, Culture, See Also

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