Politics in Fiction - Television

Television

  • Slattery's People (1964-65 American television series about local politics, starring Richard Crenna as a U.S. state legislator)
  • The Prisoner (1967)
  • The Adams Chronicles (1976 miniseries)
  • Kariera Nikodema Dyzmy (The Career of Nicodemus Dyzma — 1980 Polish TV miniseries based on the novel by Tadeusz Dołęga-Mostowicz)
  • Yes Minister (and its sequel, Yes, Prime Minister), by Antony Jay and Jonathan Lynn (1980–88)
  • Edge of Darkness (1985)
  • The New Statesman (1987-94)
  • A Very British Coup (1988)
  • Tanner '88 (1988)
  • House of Cards (1990)
  • Babylon 5 (1993)
  • A Third Choice (1996)
  • Spin City (1996-2002)
  • Nostromo (1997)
  • The West Wing (1999–2006)
  • Moncloa, ¿dígame? (2001) Sitcom about the Spanish President press office
  • 24 (2001-10)
  • The Wire (2002–08)
  • The Project (2002)
  • Absolute Power (2003, 2005)
  • Yugo the Negotiator (2004; anime, on hostage-negotiation)
  • Battlestar Galactica (2004)
  • Commander-in-Chief (2005)
  • The Thick of It, by Armando Iannucci (2005)
  • Brotherhood (2006)
  • Party Animals (BBC Two, 2007)
  • John Adams (2008) (miniseries)
  • Recount (2008)
  • The Hollowmen (ABC1, 2008)
  • Change (2008)
  • Parks and Recreation (2009)
  • Borgen (2010-2013)
  • Boss (2011)
  • Scandal (2012)
  • Political Animals (2012)
  • "Veep", by Armando Ianucci (2012)
  • House of Cards (US) (2012)

Read more about this topic:  Politics In Fiction

Famous quotes containing the word television:

    All television ever did was shrink the demand for ordinary movies. The demand for extraordinary movies increased. If any one thing is wrong with the movie industry today, it is the unrelenting effort to astonish.
    Clive James (b. 1939)

    The television critic, whatever his pretensions, does not labour in the same vineyard as those he criticizes; his grapes are all sour.
    Frederic Raphael (b. 1931)

    We cannot spare our children the influence of harmful values by turning off the television any more than we can keep them home forever or revamp the world before they get there. Merely keeping them in the dark is no protection and, in fact, can make them vulnerable and immature.
    Polly Berrien Berends (20th century)