Places That Have Decriminalized Non-medical Cannabis in The United States

Places That Have Decriminalized Non-medical Cannabis In The United States

Multiple places have decriminalized non-medical cannabis in the United States; however, cannabis is illegal under federal law. Gonzales v. Raich (2005) held in a 6-3 decision that the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution allowed the federal government to ban the use of cannabis, including medical use even if local laws allow it. Most places that have decriminalized cannabis have civil fines, drug education, or drug treatment in place of incarceration and/or criminal charges for possession of small amounts of cannabis, or have made various cannabis offenses the lowest priority for law enforcement.

Read more about Places That Have Decriminalized Non-medical Cannabis In The United States:  Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, See Also

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