Perennial Philosophy

The Perennial Philosophy, also referred to as Perennialism, is a perspective within the philosophy of religion which views each of the world’s religious traditions as sharing a single, universal truth on which foundation all religious knowledge and doctrine has grown.

The idea of a perennial philosophy has great antiquity. It can be found in many of the world's religions and philosophies. The term philosophia perennis was first used by Agostino Steuco (1497–1548), drawing on an already existing philosophical tradition, the most direct predecessors of which were Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499) and Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–94).

In the 20th century it has been popularized in the west by Aldous Huxley's book The Perennial Philosophy, published in 1945. A historical survey of the concept has been recently drawn anew by William W. Quinn, Jr., with attention to both ancient and contemporary sources.

In contemporary discourse it designates a worldview that is opposed to the scientism of modern secular societies and which promotes the rediscovery of the wisdom traditions of the pre-secular developed world.

Read more about Perennial Philosophy:  Definition, Origin of The Term, Appearance in World Religions and Philosophies

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