Pair

The word pair, derived via the French words pair/paire from the Latin par 'equal', can refer to:

  • 2 (number), two of something, a pair
  • Topological pair, an inclusion of topological spaces
  • Tuple
  • Product type
  • Au pair, a work agreement
  • Couple, various senses for two joined things
  • Even number, in roulette etc.
  • Ordered pair, in Mathematics and set theory
  • Twisted pair, a couple of electric wires twisted together
  • Pair (parliamentary convention), matching of members unable to attend, so as not to change the voting margin
  • Pair, the French equivalent of peer, holder of a French Pairie, French high title roughly equivalent to a member of the British peerage
  • Pair, a member of the Prussian House of Lords
  • Pair (Cricket): "getting a pair" means being out for 0 in both innings of a match
  • A handshaking process in Bluetooth communications
  • Pair, Pressure of air in a system
  • A team in pair skating
  • PAIR, the research group Pain & Autonomics - Integrative Research at the University of Jena in Germany
  • Pair (app), a mobile application for a couple
  • Pair of lead actors or performers, appearing in many films etc. together, also known as 'hit pair'.
  • Pairing, mathematics
  • Pairing (computing), the linking together of devices to allow communications between them

Famous quotes containing the word pair:

    What a pair of spectacles is here!
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    If I have any justification for having lived it’s simply, I’m nothing but faults, failures and so on, but I have tried to make a good pair of shoes. There’s some value in that.
    Arthur Miller (b. 1915)

    The majority of persons choose their wives with as little prudence as they eat. They see a trull with nothing else to recommend her but a pair of thighs and choice hunkers, and so smart to void their seed that they marry her at once. They imagine they can live in marvelous contentment with handsome feet and ambrosial buttocks. Most men are accredited fools shortly after they leave the womb.
    Edward Dahlberg (1900–1977)