Pair

The word pair, derived via the French words pair/paire from the Latin par 'equal', can refer to:

  • 2 (number), two of something, a pair
  • Topological pair, an inclusion of topological spaces
  • Tuple
  • Product type
  • Au pair, a work agreement
  • Couple, various senses for two joined things
  • Even number, in roulette etc.
  • Ordered pair, in Mathematics and set theory
  • Twisted pair, a couple of electric wires twisted together
  • Pair (parliamentary convention), matching of members unable to attend, so as not to change the voting margin
  • Pair, the French equivalent of peer, holder of a French Pairie, French high title roughly equivalent to a member of the British peerage
  • Pair, a member of the Prussian House of Lords
  • Pair (Cricket): "getting a pair" means being out for 0 in both innings of a match
  • A handshaking process in Bluetooth communications
  • Pair, Pressure of air in a system
  • A team in pair skating
  • PAIR, the research group Pain & Autonomics - Integrative Research at the University of Jena in Germany
  • Pair (app), a mobile application for a couple
  • Pair of lead actors or performers, appearing in many films etc. together, also known as 'hit pair'.
  • Pairing, mathematics
  • Pairing (computing), the linking together of devices to allow communications between them

Famous quotes containing the word pair:

    “You know,” said the Finn, “I got a pair of shoes older than you are.”
    William Gibson (b. 1948)

    Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all
    tongues are called fools.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Oh, Jacques, we’re used to each other, we’re a pair of captive hawks caught in the same cage, and so we’ve grown used to each other. That’s what passes for love at this dim, shadowy end of the Camino Real.
    Tennessee Williams (1914–1983)