Pair

The word pair, derived via the French words pair/paire from the Latin par 'equal', can refer to:

  • 2 (number), two of something, a pair
  • Topological pair, an inclusion of topological spaces
  • Tuple
  • Product type
  • Au pair, a work agreement
  • Couple, various senses for two joined things
  • Even number, in roulette etc.
  • Ordered pair, in Mathematics and set theory
  • Twisted pair, a couple of electric wires twisted together
  • Pair (parliamentary convention), matching of members unable to attend, so as not to change the voting margin
  • Pair, the French equivalent of peer, holder of a French Pairie, French high title roughly equivalent to a member of the British peerage
  • Pair, a member of the Prussian House of Lords
  • Pair (Cricket): "getting a pair" means being out for 0 in both innings of a match
  • A handshaking process in Bluetooth communications
  • Pair, Pressure of air in a system
  • A team in pair skating
  • PAIR, the research group Pain & Autonomics - Integrative Research at the University of Jena in Germany
  • Pair (app), a mobile application for a couple
  • Pair of lead actors or performers, appearing in many films etc. together, also known as 'hit pair'.
  • Pairing, mathematics
  • Pairing (computing), the linking together of devices to allow communications between them

Famous quotes containing the word pair:

    “You know,” said the Finn, “I got a pair of shoes older than you are.”
    William Gibson (b. 1948)

    Like to a pair of loving turtle-doves
    That could not live asunder day or night.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    If I have any justification for having lived it’s simply, I’m nothing but faults, failures and so on, but I have tried to make a good pair of shoes. There’s some value in that.
    Arthur Miller (b. 1915)