Pair

The word pair, derived via the French words pair/paire from the Latin par 'equal', can refer to:

  • 2 (number), two of something, a pair
  • Topological pair, an inclusion of topological spaces
  • Tuple
  • Product type
  • Au pair, a work agreement
  • Couple, various senses for two joined things
  • Even number, in roulette etc.
  • Ordered pair, in Mathematics and set theory
  • Twisted pair, a couple of electric wires twisted together
  • Pair (parliamentary convention), matching of members unable to attend, so as not to change the voting margin
  • Pair, the French equivalent of peer, holder of a French Pairie, French high title roughly equivalent to a member of the British peerage
  • Pair, a member of the Prussian House of Lords
  • Pair (Cricket): "getting a pair" means being out for 0 in both innings of a match
  • A handshaking process in Bluetooth communications
  • Pair, Pressure of air in a system
  • A team in pair skating
  • PAIR, the research group Pain & Autonomics - Integrative Research at the University of Jena in Germany
  • Pair (app), a mobile application for a couple
  • Pair of lead actors or performers, appearing in many films etc. together, also known as 'hit pair'.
  • Pairing, mathematics
  • Pairing (computing), the linking together of devices to allow communications between them

Famous quotes containing the word pair:

    I should have been a pair of ragged claws
    Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    She scatters
    the lotuses of her eyes
    up the street,
    waiting for you to come,
    resting her breasts on the gate
    like a pair of lucky pots.
    Hla Stavhana (c. 50 A.D.)

    To get a man soundly saved it is not enough to put on him a pair of new breeches, to give him regular work, or even to give him a University education. These things are all outside a man, and if the inside remains unchanged you have wasted your labour. You must in some way or other graft upon the man’s nature a new nature, which has in it the element of the Divine.
    William Booth (1829–1912)