Oxfordian Theory of Shakespeare Authorship - Variant Oxfordian Theories - Attribution of Other Works To Oxford

Attribution of Other Works To Oxford

As with other candidates for authorship of Shakespeare's works, Oxford's supporters have attributed numerous non-Shakespearean works to him. Looney began the process in his 1921 edition of de Vere's poetry. He suggested that de Vere was also responsible for the literary works of Arthur Golding, Anthony Munday and John Lyly. Streitz credits Oxford with the Authorized King James Version of the Bible. Two professors of linguistics have claimed that de Vere wrote not only the works of Shakespeare, but most of what is memorable in English literature during his lifetime, with such names as Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Philip Sidney, John Lyly, George Peele, George Gascoigne, Raphael Holinshed, Robert Greene, Thomas Phaer, and Arthur Golding being among dozens of further pseudonyms of de Vere. Ramon Jiménez has credited Oxford with such plays as The True Tragedy of Richard III and Edmund Ironside.

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