Non-Mendelian Inheritance

Non-Mendelian inheritance is a general term that refers to any pattern of inheritance in which traits do not segregate in accordance with Mendel’s laws. These laws describe the inheritance of traits linked to single genes on chromosomes in the nucleus. In Mendelian inheritance, each parent contributes one of two possible alleles for a trait. If the genotypes of both parents in a genetic cross are known, Mendel’s laws can be used to determine the distribution of phenotypes expected for the population of offspring. There are several situations in which the proportions of phenotypes observed in the progeny do not match the predicted values.

Although inheritance of traits in fungi, viruses, and bacteria are all non-Mendelian, the phrase "non-Mendelian inheritance" is usually only used to describe the exceptions which occur in eukaryotic reproduction.

Non-Mendelian inheritance plays a role in several disease processes.

Famous quotes containing the word inheritance:

    Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?”
    Bible: New Testament, Luke 12:13,14.

    Jesus.