Native American Mascot Controversy

Native American Mascot Controversy

The propriety of using Native American mascots and images in sports has been a topic of debate in the United States and Canada since the 1960s. Numerous civil rights, educational, athletic, and academic organizations consider the use of native names or symbols by non-native teams to be a harmful form of ethnic stereotyping which should be eliminated. Many individuals admire the heroism and romanticism evoked by the classic Native American image, but others view the use of mascots as offensive, demeaning, or racist. The controversy has resulted in many institutions changing the names and images associated with their sports teams. Native American images and nicknames nevertheless remain fairly common in American sports, and may be seen in use by teams at all levels from elementary school to professional.

Read more about Native American Mascot Controversy:  History, Argument Opposing The Use of Native American Mascots, Professional Teams, Varying Degrees of Offensiveness, Argument Supporting The Use of Native American Mascots, Financial Impact of Change, Support For Certain Teams By Individual Tribes, Current Status, See Also

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