Milk

Milk is a white liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals. It is the primary source of nutrition for young mammals before they are able to digest other types of food. Early-lactation milk contains colostrum, which carries the mother's antibodies to the baby and can reduce the risk of many diseases in the baby.

Milk is an important food with many nutrients.

World's dairy farms produced about 730 million tonnes of milk in 2011. India is the world's largest producer and consumer of milk, yet neither exports nor imports milk. New Zealand, the European Union's 27 member states, Australia, and the United States are the world's largest exporters of milk and milk products. China and Russia are the world's largest importers of milk and milk products.

Throughout the world, there are more than 6 billion consumers of milk and milk products, the majority of them in developing countries. Over 750 million people live within dairy farming households. Milk is a key contributor to improving nutrition and food security particularly in developing countries. Improvements in livestock and dairy technology offer significant promise in reducing poverty and malnutrition in the world.

Read more about Milk:  Types of Consumption, Terminology, Evolution of Lactation, History, Sources of Milk, Production Worldwide, Grading, Physical and Chemical Properties of Milk, Processing, Nutrition and Health, Controversy, Varieties and Brands, Language and Culture, Other Uses

Famous quotes containing the word milk:

    Of smale houndes hadde she that she fedde
    With rosted flessh, or milk and wastel-breed.
    But soore wepte she if oon of hem were deed,
    Or if men smoot it with a yerde smerte—
    And al was conscience and tendre herte.
    Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?–1400)

    Mother,
    strange goddess face
    above my milk home,
    that delicate asylum,
    I ate you up.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    The surprise of animals... in and out, cats and dogs and a milk goat and chickens and guinea hens, all taken for granted, as if man was intended to live on terms of friendly intercourse with the rest of creation instead of huddling in isolation on the fourteenth floor of an apartment house in a city where animals occurred behind bars in the zoo.
    Elizabeth Janeway (b. 1913)