Man's Place in Nature

Man's Place In Nature

Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature is an 1863 book by Thomas Henry Huxley, in which he gives evidence for the evolution of man and apes from a common ancestor. It was the first book devoted to the topic of human evolution, and discussed much of the anatomical and other evidence. Backed by this evidence, the book proposed to a wide readership that evolution applied as fully to man as to all other life.

Read more about Man's Place In Nature:  Precursors of The Idea, Comparison With Lyell's Antiquity of Man, Comparison With The Descent of Man

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