Manila Central Post Office

The Manila Central Post Office is the central post office of the city of Manila, Philippines. It is the head office of the Philippine Postal Corporation, and houses the country's main mail sorting-distribution operations.

Designed by Juan M. Arellano, the post office building was built in neoclassical architecture in 1926. It was severely damaged in World War II, and rebuilt in 1946 preserving most of its original design.

The location of the Post Office building in the Intramuros district of the city was part of the plan of Daniel Burnham for the city of Manila, which placed the building on the frontage of the Pasig River for easy water transportation of mails. Its central location with converging avenues made the building readily accessible from all sides. The building's main entrance faces the Liwasang Bonifacio.

Read more about Manila Central Post Office:  Picture Gallery

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