Who is ellen henrietta swallow richards?

Famous quotes containing the words henrietta swallow richards, ellen henrietta swallow, swallow richards, ellen henrietta, ellen, henrietta, swallow and/or richards:

    A political place with no power, only influence, is not to my taste.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    The well-educated young woman of 1950 will blend art and sciences in a way we do not dream of; the science will steady the art and the art will give charm to the science. This young woman will marry—yes, indeed, but she will take her pick of men, who will by that time have begun to realize what sort of men it behooves them to be.
    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    The well-educated young woman of 1950 will blend art and sciences in a way we do not dream of; the science will steady the art and the art will give charm to the science. This young woman will marry—yes, indeed, but she will take her pick of men, who will by that time have begun to realize what sort of men it behooves them to be.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    A sense of power is the most intoxicating stimulant a mortal can enjoy ...
    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    —J. Ellen Foster (1840–1910)

    There are women in middle life, whose days are crowded with practical duties, physical strain, and moral responsibility ... they fail to see that some use of the mind, in solid reading or in study, would refresh them by its contrast with carking cares, and would prepare interest and pleasure for their later years. Such women often sink into depression, as their cares fall away from them, and many even become insane. They are mentally starved to death.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    I prefer surveying for a week to spending a week in fashionable society even of the best class.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    After school days are over, the girls ... find no natural connection between their school life and the new one on which they enter, and are apt to be aimless, if not listless, needing external stimulus, and finding it only prepared for them, it may be, in some form of social excitement. ...girls after leaving school need intellectual interests, well regulated and not encroaching on home duties.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)