Making False Statements

Making false statements (18 U.S.C. ยง 1001) is the common name for the United States federal crime laid out in Section 1001 of Title 18 of the United States Code, which generally prohibits lying to or concealing (information) from a federal official by oral affirmation, written statement or mere denial.

This statute is used in many contexts. Most commonly, prosecutors use this statute to reach cover-up crimes such as perjury, false declarations, and obstruction of justice and government fraud cases. Its earliest progenitor was the False Claims Act of 1863, and in 1934 the requirement of an intent to defraud was eliminated to enforce the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) against producers of "hot oil", oil produced in violation of production restrictions established pursuant to the NIRA.

Read more about Making False Statements:  Overview, Usage, Jurisdiction, History

Famous quotes containing the words making, false and/or statements:

    “Mankind is getting smarter every day.” Actually, it only seems so. “At least we are making progress.” We’re progressing, to be sure, ever more deeply into the forest.
    Franz Grillparzer (1791–1872)

    That author who draws a character, even though to common view incongruous in its parts, as the flying-squirrel, and, at different periods, as much at variance with itself as the caterpillar is with the butterfly into which it changes, may yet, in so doing, be not false but faithful to facts.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    The statements of science are hearsay, reports from a world outside the world we know. What the poet tells us has long been known to us all, and forgotten. His knowledge is of our world, the world we are both doomed and privileged to live in, and it is a knowledge of ourselves, of the human condition, the human predicament.
    John Hall Wheelock (1886–1978)