List of Social Fraternities and Sororities

List Of Social Fraternities And Sororities

Social or general fraternities and sororities, in the North American fraternity system, are those that do not promote a particular profession (as professional fraternities are) or discipline (such as service fraternities and sororities). Instead, their primary purposes are often stated as the development of character, literary or leadership ability, or a more simple social purpose.

Fraternity is usually understood to mean a social organization composed only of men, and sorority one of women; co-ed groups are usually called "co-ed fraternities." Traditionally these organizations have names consisting of three or occasionally two letters of the Greek alphabet, leading to their being referred to informally in various contexts as being "Greek". For the purposes of this article, national also includes international organizations, and local refers to organizations that are either composed of only one chapter, or are extremely limited in geographic and chapter roll size.

Read more about List Of Social Fraternities And Sororities:  Nicknames, Defunct National Organizations

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