Le Corbusier

Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, better known as Le Corbusier (; October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965), was an architect, designer, urbanist, and writer, famous for being one of the pioneers of what is now called modern architecture. He was born in Switzerland and became a French citizen in 1930. His career spanned five decades, with his buildings constructed throughout Europe, India and America.

He was a pioneer in studies of modern high design and was dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities.

Le Corbusier adopted his pseudonym in the 1920s, allegedly deriving it in part from the name of a distant ancestor, "Lecorbésier."

He was awarded the Frank P. Brown Medal and AIA Gold Medal in 1961.

Read more about Le Corbusier:  Criticisms, Influence, Major Buildings and Projects, Major Written Works, Quotations, Memorials

Famous quotes containing the word corbusier:

    Le Corbusier was the sort of relentlessly rational intellectual that only France loves wholeheartedly, the logician who flies higher and higher in ever-decreasing circles until, with one last, utterly inevitable induction, he disappears up his own fundamental aperture and emerges in the fourth dimension as a needle-thin umber bird.
    Tom Wolfe (b. 1931)