Journal

A journal (through French from Latin diurnalis, daily) has several related meanings:

  • a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary
  • a newspaper or other periodical, in the literal sense of one published each day
  • many publications issued at stated intervals, such as magazines, or scholarly journals, academic journals, or the record of the transactions of a society, are often called journals. Although journal is sometimes used as a synonym for "magazine", in academic use, a journal refers to a serious, scholarly publication that is peer-reviewed. A non-scholarly magazine written for an educated audience about an industry or an area of professional activity is usually called a professional magazine.

The word "journalist", for one whose business is writing for the public press and nowadays also other media, has been in use since the end of the 17th century.

Read more about Journal:  Open Access, Public Journal, Business and Accounting

Famous quotes containing the word journal:

    The Journal is not essentially a confession, a story about oneself. It is a Memorial. What does the writer have to remember? Himself, who he is when he is not writing, when he is living his daily life, when he alive and real, and not dying and without truth.
    Maurice Blanchot (b. 1907)

    The writer in me can look as far as an African-American woman and stop. Often that writer looks through the African-American woman. Race is a layer of being, but not a culmination.
    Thylias Moss, African American poet. As quoted in the Wall Street Journal (May 12, 1994)

    What the Journal posits is not the tragic question, the Madman’s question: “Who am I?”, but the comic question, the Bewildered Man’s question: “Am I?” A comic—a comedian, that’s what the Journal keeper is.
    Roland Barthes (1915–1980)