Journal

A journal (through French from Latin diurnalis, daily) has several related meanings:

  • a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary
  • a newspaper or other periodical, in the literal sense of one published each day
  • many publications issued at stated intervals, such as magazines, or scholarly journals, academic journals, or the record of the transactions of a society, are often called journals. Although journal is sometimes used as a synonym for "magazine", in academic use, a journal refers to a serious, scholarly publication that is peer-reviewed. A non-scholarly magazine written for an educated audience about an industry or an area of professional activity is usually called a professional magazine.

The word "journalist", for one whose business is writing for the public press and nowadays also other media, has been in use since the end of the 17th century.

Read more about Journal:  Open Access, Public Journal, Business and Accounting

Famous quotes containing the word journal:

    I think this journal will be disadvantageous for me, for I spend my time now like a spider spinning my own entrails.
    Mary Bokin Chesnut (1823–1886)

    After the writer’s death, reading his journal is like receiving a long letter.
    Jean Cocteau (1889–1963)

    Unfortunately, many things have been omitted which should have been recorded in our journal; for though we made it a rule to set down all our experiences therein, yet such a resolution is very hard to keep, for the important experience rarely allows us to remember such obligations, and so indifferent things get recorded, while that is frequently neglected. It is not easy to write in a journal what interests us at any time, because to write it is not what interests us.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)