Ground

Ground may refer to:

  • Earth's surface
  • Soil, a mixture of clay, sand and organic matter present on the surface of the Earth and serving as substrate for plant growth and micro-organisms development
  • Ground, in electrical engineering, something that is connected to the Earth or at the voltage defined as zero (in the U.S., called ground; in the UK, called earth):
    • Earthing system
    • Ground (electricity)
    • Ground and neutral
  • Ground (often grounds), in law, a rational motive, basis for a belief or conviction, for an action taken, such as a legal action or argument; reason or cause:
    • Grounds for divorce
    • Grounds for dismissal
  • Common ground, in communication, people sharing some common understanding
  • Coffee grounds, ground coffee beans
  • Socially grounded argument—in philosophy, arguments that take social conditions as their starting point
  • Ground bass, in music, a bass part that continually repeats, while the melody and harmony over it change
  • Ground tissue, one of the three types of tissue systems in a plant
  • Ground term, in symbolic logic, a term with no variables
  • Ground surface, often on metals, created by various grinding operations
  • Football stadium
  • Ground (unit), a unit of area used in India
  • Ground a drawing surface or a coating applied to a substrate for a drawing surface
  • The Ground, a 2005 album by Norwegian jazz pianist Tord Gustavsen

Famous quotes containing the word ground:

    Rational free spirits are the light brigade who go on ahead and reconnoitre the ground which the heavy brigade of the orthodox will eventually occupy.
    —G.C. (Georg Christoph)

    The future is just as much a condition of the present as is the past. “What shall be and must be is the ground of that which is.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    Like plowing, housework makes the ground ready for the germination of family life. The kids will not invite a teacher home if beer cans litter the living room. The family isn’t likely to have breakfast together if somebody didn’t remember to buy eggs, milk, or muffins. Housework maintains an orderly setting in which family life can flourish.
    Letty Cottin Pogrebin (20th century)