Ground

Ground may refer to:

  • Earth's surface
  • Soil, a mixture of clay, sand and organic matter present on the surface of the Earth and serving as substrate for plant growth and micro-organisms development
  • Ground, in electrical engineering, something that is connected to the Earth or at the voltage defined as zero (in the U.S., called ground; in the UK, called earth):
    • Earthing system
    • Ground (electricity)
    • Ground and neutral
  • Ground (often grounds), in law, a rational motive, basis for a belief or conviction, for an action taken, such as a legal action or argument; reason or cause:
    • Grounds for divorce
    • Grounds for dismissal
  • Common ground, in communication, people sharing some common understanding
  • Coffee grounds, ground coffee beans
  • Socially grounded argument—in philosophy, arguments that take social conditions as their starting point
  • Ground bass, in music, a bass part that continually repeats, while the melody and harmony over it change
  • Ground tissue, one of the three types of tissue systems in a plant
  • Ground term, in symbolic logic, a term with no variables
  • Ground surface, often on metals, created by various grinding operations
  • Football stadium
  • Ground (unit), a unit of area used in India
  • Ground a drawing surface or a coating applied to a substrate for a drawing surface
  • The Ground, a 2005 album by Norwegian jazz pianist Tord Gustavsen

Famous quotes containing the word ground:

    All I’m telling you is that that little creature in there has as much right to live as you do. Don’t forget, you invaded his world. You sank a pipe six miles into the ground and when he climbed up you set dogs on him, shot him.
    Richard Fielding, and Lee Sholem. Superman (George Reeves)

    Having interr’d her Infant-birth,
    The watry ground that late did mourn,
    Was strew’d with flow’rs for the return
    Of the wish’d Bridegroom of the earth.
    Edward Herbert (1583–1648)

    The mode of clearing and planting is to fell the trees, and burn once what will burn, then cut them up into suitable lengths, roll into heaps, and burn again; then, with a hoe, plant potatoes where you can come at the ground between the stumps and charred logs; for a first crop the ashes suffice for manure, and no hoeing being necessary the first year. In the fall, cut, roll, and burn again, and so on, till the land is cleared; and soon it is ready for grain, and to be laid down.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)