Green Man

A Green Man is a sculpture, drawing, or other representation of a face surrounded by or made from leaves. Branches or vines may sprout from the nose, mouth, nostrils or other parts of the face and these shoots may bear flowers or fruit. Commonly used as a decorative architectural ornament, Green Men are frequently found on carvings in churches and other buildings (both secular and ecclesiastical). "The Green Man" is also a popular name for English public houses and various interpretations of the name appear on inn signs, which sometimes show a full figure rather than just the head.

The Green Man motif has many variations. Found in many cultures around the world, the Green Man is often related to natural vegetative deities springing up in different cultures throughout the ages. Primarily it is interpreted as a symbol of rebirth, or "renaissance", representing the cycle of growth each spring. Some speculate that the mythology of the Green Man developed independently in the traditions of separate ancient cultures and evolved into the wide variety of examples found throughout history.

Read more about Green Man:  Types of Green Men, Green Men in Churches, Later Variations On The Green Man Theme, Related Characters, Green Men Outside Europe, Gallery

Famous quotes containing the words green and/or man:

    Many a green isle needs must be
    In the deep wide sea of Misery,
    Or the mariner, worn and wan,
    Never thus could voyage on
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    A man of my spiritual intensity does not eat corpses.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)