Great Depression in The United Kingdom

The Great Depression in the United Kingdom, also known as the Great Slump, was a period of national economic downturn in the 1930s, which had its origins in the global Great Depression. It was Britain's largest and most profound economic depression of the 20th century. The Great Depression originated in the United States in late 1929 and quickly spread to the world. Britain had never experienced the boom that had characterized the U.S., Germany, Canada and Australia in the 1920s, so its bust appeared less severe. Britain's world trade fell in half (1929-33), the output of heavy industry fell by a third, employment profits plunged in nearly all sectors. At the depth in summer 1932, registered unemployed numbered 3.5 million, and many more had only part-time employment.

Particularly hardest hit by economic problems were the industrial and mining areas in the north of England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. Unemployment reached 70% in some areas at the start of the 1930s (with more than 3 million out of work nationally) and many families depended entirely on payments from local government known as the dole. Politically the Conservative Party dominated and the Labour Party was seriously hurt.

Read more about Great Depression In The United Kingdom:  Background, Gold Standard, Economic Crisis and The Labour Government 1929-1931, National Government, During The Recession, Welfare State During The 1930s, Slow Recovery, Rearmament and Recovery, Consequences of The Great Depression, Historic Evaluation

Famous quotes containing the words depression, united and/or kingdom:

    During depression the world disappears. Language itself. One has nothing to say. Nothing. No small talk, no anecdotes. Nothing can be risked on the board of talk. Because the inner voice is so urgent in its own discourse: How shall I live? How shall I manage the future? Why should I go on?
    Kate Millett (b. 1934)

    The Federated Republic of Europe—the United States of Europe—that is what must be. National autonomy no longer suffices. Economic evolution demands the abolition of national frontiers. If Europe is to remain split into national groups, then Imperialism will recommence its work. Only a Federated Republic of Europe can give peace to the world.
    Leon Trotsky (1879–1940)

    A box of teak, a box of sandalwood,
    A brass-ringed spyglass in a case,
    A coin, leaf-thin with many polishings,
    Last kingdom of a gold forgotten face,
    These lie about the room....
    Philip Larkin (1922–1986)