Gravitational Field

In physics, a gravitational field is a model used to explain the influence that a massive body extends into the space around itself, producing a force on another massive body. Thus, a gravitational field is used to explain gravitational phenomena, and is measured in newtons per kilogram (N/kg). In its original concept, gravity was a force between point masses. Following Newton, Laplace attempted to model gravity as some kind of radiation field or fluid, and since the 19th century explanations for gravity have usually been sought in terms of a field model, rather than a point attraction.

In a field model, rather than two particles attracting each other, the particles distort spacetime via their mass, and this distortion is what is perceived and measured as a "force". In such a model one states that matter moves in certain ways in response to the curvature of spacetime, and that there is either no gravitational force, or that gravity is a fictitious force.

Read more about Gravitational Field:  Classical Mechanics, General Relativity, Generally Accepted Fundamental Hypothesis

Famous quotes containing the word field:

    Beat! beat! drums!—blow! bugles! blow!
    Through the windows—through doors—burst like a ruthless force,
    Into the solemn church, and scatter the congregation;
    Into the school where the scholar is studying;
    Leave not the bridegroom quiet—no happiness must he have now with his bride;
    Nor the peaceful farmer any peace, plough his field or gathering his
    grain;
    So fierce you whirr and pound, you drums—so shrill you bugles blow.
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892)