Gothic Novels

Gothic Novels

Gothic fiction, sometimes referred to as Gothic horror, is a genre or mode of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. Gothicism's origin is attributed to English author Horace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle of Otranto, subtitled "A Gothic Story". The effect of Gothic fiction feeds on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. Melodrama and parody (including self-parody) were other long-standing features of the Gothic initiated by Walpole.

Read more about Gothic Novels:  Developments in Continental Europe, and The Monk, German Gothic Fiction, Gothic Fiction From The Russian Empire, The Romantics, Victorian Gothic, Parody

Famous quotes containing the words gothic and/or novels:

    The Gothic cathedral is a blossoming in stone subdued by the insatiable demand of harmony in man.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The present era grabs everything that was ever written in order to transform it into films, TV programmes, or cartoons. What is essential in a novel is precisely what can only be expressed in a novel, and so every adaptation contains nothing but the non-essential. If a person is still crazy enough to write novels nowadays and wants to protect them, he has to write them in such a way that they cannot be adapted, in other words, in such a way that they cannot be retold.
    Milan Kundera (b. 1929)