Gothic Fiction

Gothic Fiction

Gothic fiction, sometimes referred to as Gothic horror, is a genre or mode of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. Gothicism's origin is attributed to English author Horace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle of Otranto, subtitled "A Gothic Story". The effect of Gothic fiction feeds on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. Melodrama and parody (including self-parody) were other long-standing features of the Gothic initiated by Walpole.

Read more about Gothic Fiction:  Developments in Continental Europe, and The Monk, German Gothic Fiction, Gothic Fiction From The Russian Empire, The Romantics, Victorian Gothic, Parody

Famous quotes containing the words gothic and/or fiction:

    The gothic is singular in this; one seems easily at home in the renaissance; one is not too strange in the Byzantine; as for the Roman, it is ourselves; and we could walk blindfolded through every chink and cranny of the Greek mind; all these styles seem modern when we come close to them; but the gothic gets away.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)