Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI

Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD VI) is a type of glycogen storage disease caused by a deficiency in liver glycogen phosphorylase or other components of the associated phosphorylase cascade system.

It is also known as "Hers' disease", after Henri G. Hers, who characterized it in 1959.

The scope of GSD VI now also includes glycogen storage disease type VIII, IX (caused by phosphorylase b kinase deficiency) and X (deficiency of protein kinase A). These were previously considered to be distinct GSD types.

The incidence of GSD VI is approximately 1 case per 65,000–85,000 births, representing approximately 30% all cases of glycogen storage disease. Approximately 75% of these GSD VI cases result from the X-linked recessive forms of phosphorylase kinase deficiency. All other forms are autosomal recessive.

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