Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway

The Glasgow and Paisley Joint Railway company was formed in 1837 to provide a railway link between Glasgow and Paisley, Scotland. It was promoted jointly by the Glasgow, Paisley and Greenock Railway and the Glasgow, Paisley, Kilmarnock and Ayr Railway.

With the passing of the Railways Act 1921 (Grouping Act) the line, together with the Caledonian and Glasgow and South Western railways, became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS). The line is still in use today as the eastern end of the Inverclyde Line and the Ayrshire Coast Line.

Read more about Glasgow And Paisley Joint Railway:  Formation, Glasgow Extensions and Service Redirections, Govan and Princes Dock Branches, Connections To Other Lines, Quadruple Tracks, Present Day: Inverclyde and Ayrshire Coast Lines, Accidents

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