Gertrude Stein

Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was a noted American art collector of seminal modernist paintings and an experimental writer of novels, poetry and plays, which eschewed the narrative, linear, and temporal conventions of 19th century literature. She moved to Paris in 1903, making France her home for the remainder of her life. For some forty years, the Stein home on the Left Bank of Paris would become a renowned Saturday evening gathering place for expatriate American artists and writers, and others noteworthy in the world of vanguard arts and letters. Entrée and membership in the Stein salon was a sought-after validation, signifying that Stein had recognized a talent worthy of inclusion into a rarefied group of gifted artists. Stein became combination mentor, critic, and guru to those who gathered around her. A self-defined "genius", she was described as an imposing figure with a commanding manner whose inordinate self-confidence could intimidate. Among her coterie she was referred to as “Le Stein” and with less laudatory deference as “The Presence.”

In 1933, Stein published the memoirs of her Paris years titled The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, which became a literary bestseller. The advent of this book elevated Stein from the relative obscurity of cult literary figure, into the light of mainstream attention.

Near the end of her life Stein pronounced: "I always wanted to be historical from almost a baby on, I felt that way about it..."

Read more about Gertrude Stein:  Early Life, Art Collection, 27 Rue De Fleurus: The Stein Salon, Literary Style, Literary Career, Alice B.Toklas, Political Views, Stein During World War II, Death, Critical Reception of Stein As Writer, Legacy and Commemoration, Published Works, Related Exhibits

Famous quotes by gertrude stein:

    Native always means people who belong somewhere else, because they had once belonged somewhere. That shows that the white race does not really think they belong anywhere because they think of everybody else as native.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    It is natural not to care about a sister certainly not when she is four years older and grinds her teeth at night.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    There is singularly nothing that makes a difference a difference in beginning and in the middle and in ending except that each generation has something different at which they are all looking. By this I mean so simply that anybody knows it that composition is the difference which makes each and all of them then different from other generations and this is what makes everything different otherwise they are all alike and everybody knows it because everybody says it.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    Remarks are not literature.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    It is always a mistake to be plain-spoken.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)