Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology

Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology (GERAM) is a generalised Enterprise Architecture framework for enterprise integration and business process engineering. It identifies the set of components recommended for use in enterprise engineering.

This framework is developed in the 1990s by an IFAC/IFIP Task Force on Architectures for Enterprise Integration. The development starting with the evaluation of existing frameworks for enterprise integration which was developed into an overall definition of a socalled "generalised architecture", which was named GERAM for "Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology".

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