General Relativity - Relationship With Quantum Theory

Relationship With Quantum Theory

If general relativity is considered one of the two pillars of modern physics, quantum theory, the basis of understanding matter from elementary particles to solid state physics, is the other. However, it is still an open question as to how the concepts of quantum theory can be reconciled with those of general relativity.

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