Who is willard van orman quine?

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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    The lore of our fathers is a fabric of sentences.... It is a pale gray lore, black with fact and white with convention. But I have found no substantial reasons for concluding that there are any quite black threads in it, or any white ones.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Different persons growing up in the same language are like different bushes trimmed and trained to take the shape of identical elephants. The anatomical details of twigs and branches will fulfill the elephantine form differently from bush to bush, but the overall outward results are alike.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    We do not learn first what to talk about and then what to say about it.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Entification begins at arm’s length; the points of condensation in the primordial conceptual scheme are things glimpsed, not glimpses.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Rocked in the cradle of the deep
    I lay me down in peace to sleep;
    Secure I rest upon the wave,
    For Thou, O Lord! hast power to save.
    —Emma Hart Willard (1787–1870)

    ‘Ouch’ is not independent of social training. One has only to prick a foreigner to appreciate that it is an English word.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Our acceptance of an ontology is, I think, similar in principle to our acceptance of a scientific theory, say a system of physics; we adopt, at least insofar as we are reasonable, the simplest conceptual scheme into which the disordered fragments of raw experience can be fitted and arranged.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    An indirect quotation we can usually expect to rate only as better or worse, more or less faithful, and we cannot even hope for a strict standard of more and less; what is involved is evaluation, relative to special purposes, of an essentially dramatic act.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)