Who is willard van orman quine?

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

Read more about Willard Van Orman Quine.

Famous quotes containing the words van orman quine, willard van orman, orman quine, willard van, willard, van, orman and/or quine:

    Some have said that the thesis [of indeterminacy] is a consequence of my behaviorism. Some have said that it is a reductio ad absurdum of my behaviorism. I disagree with this second point, but I agree with the first. I hold further that the behaviorism approach is mandatory. In psychology one may or may not be a behaviorist, but in linguistics one has no choice.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    It makes no sense to say what the objects of a theory are,
    beyond saying how to interpret or reinterpret that theory in another.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Entification begins at arm’s length; the points of condensation in the primordial conceptual scheme are things glimpsed, not glimpses.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    The lore of our fathers is a fabric of sentences. In our hands it develops and changes, through more or less arbitrary and deliberate revisions and additions of our own, more or less directly occasioned by the continuing stimulation of our sense organs. It is a pale gray lore, black with fact and white with convention. But I have found no substantial reasons for concluding that there are any quite black threads in it, or any white ones.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    And such the trust that still were mine,
    Though stormy winds swept o’er the brine,
    Or though the tempest’s fiery breath
    Roused me from sleep to wreck and death.
    In ocean cave, still safe with Thee
    The germ of immortality!
    And calm and peaceful shall I sleep,
    Rocked in the cradle of the deep.
    —Emma Hart Willard (1787–1870)

    I can’t work without a model. I won’t say I turn my back on nature ruthlessly in order to turn a study into a picture, arranging the colors, enlarging and simplifying; but in the matter of form I am too afraid of departing from the possible and the true.
    —Vincent Van Gogh (1853–1890)

    It is one of the consolations of philosophy that the benefit of showing how to dispense with a concept does not hinge on dispensing with it.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    If there is a case for mental events and mental states, it must be that the positing of them, like the positing of molecules, has some indirect systematic efficacy in the development of theory.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)