Who is willard van orman quine?

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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    Meaning is what essence becomes when it is divorced from the object of reference and wedded to the word.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Theory may be deliberate, as in a chapter on chemistry, or it may be second nature, as in the immemorial doctrine of ordinary enduring middle-sized physical objects.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    The familiar material objects may not be all that is real, but they are admirable examples.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    It makes no sense to say what the objects of a theory are,
    beyond saying how to interpret or reinterpret that theory in another.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Rocked in the cradle of the deep
    I lay me down in peace to sleep;
    Secure I rest upon the wave,
    For Thou, O Lord! hast power to save.
    —Emma Hart Willard (1787–1870)

    The three main medieval points of view regarding universals are designated by historians as realism, conceptualism, and nominalism. Essentially these same three doctrines reappear in twentieth-century surveys of the philosophy of mathematics under the new names logicism, intuitionism, and formalism.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Entification begins at arm’s length; the points of condensation in the primordial conceptual scheme are things glimpsed, not glimpses.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Unlike Descartes, we own and use our beliefs of the moment, even in the midst of philosophizing, until by what is vaguely called scientific method we change them here and there for the better. Within our own total evolving doctrine, we can judge truth as earnestly and absolutely as can be, subject to correction, but that goes without saying.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)