Who is willard van orman quine?

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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    Meaning is what essence becomes when it is divorced from the object of reference and wedded to the word.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Our talk of external things, our very notion of things, is just a conceptual apparatus that helps us to foresee and control the triggerings of our sensory receptors in the light of previous triggering of our sensory receptors.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Our talk of external things, our very notion of things, is just a conceptual apparatus that helps us to foresee and control the triggerings of our sensory receptors in the light of previous triggering of our sensory receptors.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Uncritical semantics is the myth of a museum in which the exhibits are meanings and the words are labels. To switch languages is to change the labels.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    In externals we advance with lightening express speed, in modes of thought and sympathy we lumber on in stage-coach fashion.
    —Frances E. Willard 1839–1898, U.S. president of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union 1879-1891, author, activist. The Woman’s Magazine, pp. 137-40 (January 1887)

    I philosophize from the vantage point only of our own
    provincial conceptual scheme and scientific epoch, true; but I know no better.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    It is one of the consolations of philosophy that the benefit of showing how to dispense with a concept does not hinge on dispensing with it.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Language is a social art.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)