Who is willard van orman quine?

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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    Linguistically, and hence conceptually, the things in sharpest focus are the things that are public enough to be talked of publicly, common and conspicuous enough to be talked of often, and near enough to sense to be quickly identified and learned by name; it is to these that words apply first and foremost.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    [T]here is no breaking out of the intentional vocabulary by explaining its members in other terms.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Our acceptance of an ontology is, I think, similar in principle to our acceptance of a scientific theory, say a system of physics; we adopt, at least insofar as we are reasonable, the simplest conceptual scheme into which the disordered fragments of raw experience can be fitted and arranged.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    One man’s observation is another man’s closed book or flight of fancy.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Rocked in the cradle of the deep
    I lay me down in peace to sleep;
    Secure I rest upon the wave,
    For Thou, O Lord! hast power to save.
    —Emma Hart Willard (1787–1870)

    This is The End—of the Beginning.
    —Rip Van Ronkel, and Robert A. Heinlein (1907–1988)

    We do not learn first what to talk about and then what to say about it.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    The mastery of one’s phonemes may be compared to the violinist’s mastery of fingering. The violin string lends itself to a continuous gradation of tones, but the musician learns the discrete intervals at which to stop the string in order to play the conventional notes. We sound our phonemes like poor violinists, approximating each time to a fancied norm, and we receive our neighbor’s renderings indulgently, mentally rectifying the more glaring inaccuracies.
    —W.V. Quine (b. 1908)