General Mobile Radio Service

The General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a North American land-mobile FM UHF radio service designed for short-distance two-way communication. It requires a license in United States but can be used license-free in Canada. The United States permits use by an adult individual who possesses a valid GMRS license, as well as his or her immediate family members. Immediate relatives of the GMRS system licensee are entitled to communicate among themselves for personal or business purposes, but employees of the licensee, who are not family members, are not covered by the same license.

GMRS radios are typically handheld portable devices much like Family Radio Service (FRS) radios, and share the FRS frequency band near 462 and 467 MHz. Mobile and base station-style radios are available as well, but these are normally commercial UHF radios as often used in the public service and commercial land mobile bands. These are legal for use in this service as long as they are GMRS type-approved. They are more expensive than the walkie talkies typically found in discount electronics stores, and are generally considered higher quality.

Read more about General Mobile Radio Service:  Licensing, Range, Frequency Assignments and FRS, Frequency Chart, History, Use of GMRS Equipment in Other Countries

Famous quotes containing the words general, mobile, radio and/or service:

    The general will is always right.
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712–1778)

    From three to six months, most babies have settled down enough to be fun but aren’t mobile enough to be getting into trouble. This is the time to pay some attention to your relationship again. Otherwise, you may spend the entire postpartum year thinking you married the wrong person and overlooking the obvious—that parenthood can create rough spots even in the smoothest marriage.
    Anne Cassidy (20th century)

    Having a thirteen-year-old in the family is like having a general-admission ticket to the movies, radio and TV. You get to understand that the glittering new arts of our civilization are directed to the teen-agers, and by their suffrage they stand or fall.
    Max Lerner (b. 1902)

    The master class seldom lose a chance to insult a woman who has the ability for something besides service to his lordship.
    Caroline Nichols Churchill (1833–?)