Gauss' Law For Gravity

Gauss' Law For Gravity

In physics, Gauss's law for gravity, also known as Gauss's flux theorem for gravity, is a law of physics which is essentially equivalent to Newton's law of universal gravitation. It is named after Carl Friedrich Gauss. Although Gauss's law for gravity is physically equivalent to Newton's law, there are many situations where Gauss's law for gravity offers a more convenient and simple way to do a calculation than Newton's law.

The form of Gauss's law for gravity is mathematically similar to Gauss's law for electrostatics, one of Maxwell's equations. Gauss's law for gravity has the same mathematical relation to Newton's law that Gauss's law for electricity bears to Coulomb's law. This is because both Newton's law and Coulomb's law describe inverse-square interaction in a 3-dimensional space.

Read more about Gauss' Law For Gravity:  Qualitative Statement of The Law, Integral Form, Differential Form, Poisson's Equation and Gravitational Potential, Applications, Derivation From Lagrangian

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