Frozen

Frozen may refer to:

  • the result of freezing

In film:

  • Frozen (1997 film), a film by Wang Xiaoshuai
  • Frozen (2005 film), a film by Juliet McKoen
  • Frozen (2007 film), a film by Shivajee Chandrabhushan
  • Frozen (2010 American film), a film by Adam Green
  • Frozen (2010 Hong Kong film), a film by Derek Kwok
  • Frozen (2013 film), a film by Chris Buck

In theatre:

  • Frozen (play), a 2004 stage play by Bryony Lavery

In television:

  • "Frozen" (Stargate SG-1), a Stargate SG-1 episode
  • "Frozen" (House episode), a House episode

In music:

  • Frozen (album), by Sentenced
  • "Frozen" (Madonna song)
  • "Frozen" (Delain song)
  • "Frozen" (Within Temptation song)
  • "Frozen" (Tami Chynn song)
  • "Frozen", a 1993 song from Dissection's The Somberlain
  • "Frozen", a 1995 song from Skid Row's Subhuman Race
  • "Frozen", a 2003 song from Celldweller's Celldweller
  • "Frozen", a 2010 song from Gregorian's The Dark Side Of The Chant

Famous quotes containing the word frozen:

    Westminster Abbey is nature crystallized into a conventional form by man, with his sorrows, his joys, his failures, and his seeking for the Great Spirit. It is a frozen requiem, with a nation’s prayer ever in dumb music ascending.
    M. E. W. Sherwood (1826–1903)

    Governments can err, Presidents do make mistakes, but the immortal Dante tells us that divine justice weighs the sins of the cold-blooded and the sins of the warm-hearted in different scales. Better the occasional faults of a Government that lives in a spirit of charity than the constant omission of a Government frozen in the ice of its own indifference.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)

    Ice is an interesting subject for contemplation. They told me that they had some in the ice-houses at Fresh Pond five years old which was as good as ever. Why is it that a bucket of water soon becomes putrid, but frozen remains sweet forever? It is commonly said that this is the difference between the affections and the intellect.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)