Frances Burney

Frances Burney (13 June 1752 – 6 January 1840), also known as Fanny Burney and, after her marriage, as Madame d’Arblay, was an English novelist, diarist and playwright. She was born in Lynn Regis, now King’s Lynn, England, on 13 June 1752, to musical historian Dr Charles Burney (1726–1814) and Mrs Esther Sleepe Burney (1725–62). The third of six children, she was self-educated and began writing what she called her “scribblings” at the age of ten. In 1793, aged forty-two, she married a French exile, General Alexandre D'Arblay. Their only son, Alexander, was born in 1794. After a lengthy writing career, and travels that took her to France for more than ten years, she settled in Bath, England, where she died on 6 January 1840.

Read more about Frances Burney:  Overview of Her Career, Family Life, Education, Journal-diaries and The History of Caroline Evelyn, Evelina, Critical Reception, Hester Thrale and Streatham, The Witlings, Cecilia, The Royal Court, Marriage, Camilla, Comedies, Life in France: Revolution and Mastectomy, The Wanderer and Memoirs of Dr. Burney

Famous quotes by frances burney:

    At the milliners, the ladies we met were so much dressed, that I should rather have imagined they were making visits than purchases. But what diverted me most was, that we were more frequently served by men than by women; and such men! so finical, so affected! they seemed to understand every part of a woman’s dress better than we do ourselves; and they recommended caps and ribbons with an air of so much importance, that I wished to ask them how long they had left off wearing them.
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)

    Well may Mr. [David] Garrick be so celebrated, so universally admired—I had not any idea of so great a performer. Such ease! such vivacity in his manner! such grace in his motions! such fire and meaning in his eyes!—I could hardly believe he had studied a written part, for every word seemed uttered from the impulse of the moment. ... his voice—so clear, so melodious, yet so wonderfully various in its tones!
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)

    Hetty [Burney’s sister] set down to the harpsichord and sung ... we departed this life of anguish and misery, and rested our weary souls in the Elysian field—my papa’s study—there, freed from the noise and bustle of the world enjoyed the harmony of chattering—and the melody of music!
    Frances Burney (1752–1840)