Disposition

A disposition is a habit, a preparation, a state of readiness, or a tendency to act in a specified way.

The terms dispositional belief and occurrent belief refer, in the former case, to a belief that is held in the mind but not currently being considered, and in the latter case, to a belief that is currently being considered by the mind.

In Bourdieu's theory of fields dispositions are the natural tendencies of each individual to take on a certain position in any field. There is no strict determinism through one's dispositions. In fact, the habitus is the choice of positions according to one's dispositions. However, in retrospect a space of possibles can always be observed.

Famous quotes containing the word disposition:

    The Englishman’s strong point is his vigorous insularity; that of the American his power of adaptation. Each of these attitudes has its perils. The Englishman stands firmly on his feet, but he who merely does this never advances. The American’s disposition is to step forward even at the risk of a fall.
    Thomas Wentworth Higginson (1823–1911)

    A disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve, taken together, would be my standard of a statesman.
    Edmund Burke (1729–1797)

    A lioness, with udders all drawn dry,
    Lay couching, head on ground, with cat-like watch
    When that the sleeping man should stir; for ‘tis
    The royal disposition of that beast
    To prey on nothing that doth seem as dead.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)