Cultural Depictions of The Salem Witch Trials

Cultural depictions of the Salem witch trials abound in art, literature and popular media in the United States, from the early 19th century to the present day. The literature and some televisual depictions are discussed in Marion Gibson's Witchcraft Myths in American Culture (New York: Routledge, 2007) and see also Bernard Rosenthal's Salem Story: Reading the Witch Trials of 1692 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).

Read more about Cultural Depictions Of The Salem Witch Trials:  The Salem Witch Trials in Literature, Collectibles, 19th Century Illustrations Depicting The Episode, 19th and 20th Century Photographs of 17th Century Buildings Related To The Episode

Famous quotes containing the words cultural, depictions, salem, witch and/or trials:

    A society that has made “nostalgia” a marketable commodity on the cultural exchange quickly repudiates the suggestion that life in the past was in any important way better than life today.
    Christopher Lasch (b. 1932)

    Surely, of all creatures we eat, we are most brutal to snails. Helix optera is dug out of the earth where he has been peacefully enjoying his summer sleep, cracked like an egg, and eaten raw, presumably alive. Or boiled in oil. Or roasted in the hot ashes of a wood fire.... If God is a snail, Bosch’s depictions of Hell are going to look like a vicarage tea-party.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    I have always endeavored to acquire strict business habits; they are indispensable to every man. If your trade is with the Celestial Empire, then some small counting house on the coast, in some Salem harbor, will be fixture enough.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I am no more a witch than you are a wizard. If you take my life away, God will give you blood to drink.
    Sarah Good (?–1692)

    Misfortune is never mournful to the soul that accepts it; for such do always see that every cloud is an angel’s face. Every man deems that he has precisely the trials and temptations which are the hardest of all others for him to bear; but they are so, simply because they are the very ones he most needs.
    Lydia M. Child (1802–1880)