Courage

Courage is the ability to confront fear, pain, danger, uncertainty, or intimidation. "Physical courage" is courage in the face of physical pain, hardship, death, or threat of death, while "moral courage" is the ability to act rightly in the face of popular opposition, shame, scandal, or discouragement.

In some traditions, fortitude holds approximately the same meaning as courage. In the Western tradition, notable thoughts on courage have come from philosophers such as Aristotle, Aquinas and Kierkegaard; in the Eastern tradition, some thoughts on courage were offered by the Tao Te Ching. More recently, courage has been explored by the discipline of psychology.

Read more about Courage:  Symbolism, Awards, As A Strength in Psychology

Famous quotes containing the word courage:

    When they [the American soldiers] came, they found fit comrades for their courage and their devotion.... Joining hands with them, the men of America gave the greatest of all gifts, the gift of life and the gift of spirit.
    Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924)

    Scarlett O’Hara: What shall we do? Ashley, what’s to become of us?
    Ashley Wilkes: What do you think becomes of people when their civilization breaks up? Those who have brains and courage come through all right. Those who aren’t are winnowed out.
    Sidney Howard (1891–1939)

    Another danger is imminent: A contested result. And we have no such means for its decision as ought to be provided by law. This must be attended to hereafter.... If a contest comes now it may lead to a conflict of arms. I can only try to do my duty to my countrymen in that case. I shall let no personal ambition turn me from the path of duty. Bloodshed and civil war must be averted if possible. If forced to fight, I have no fears from lack of courage or firmness.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)