Copyright in Architecture in The United States - Ownership of Copyright in Architectural Designs

Ownership of Copyright in Architectural Designs

Under 17 U.S.C. ยง 201(a), "copyright in a work . . . vests initially in the author or authors of the work." Although the Copyright Act does not define "author", a person who creates a work is generally considered an author. Thus, an architect will almost always own his own designs. A few exceptions, however, are discussed below.

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Famous quotes containing the words ownership of, ownership and/or designs:

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    They had their fortunes to make, everything to gain and nothing to lose. They were schooled in and anxious for debates; forcible in argument; reckless and brilliant. For them it was but a short and natural step from swaying juries in courtroom battles over the ownership of land to swaying constituents in contests for office. For the lawyer, oratory was the escalator that could lift a political candidate to higher ground.
    —Federal Writers’ Project Of The Wor, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

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