Who is henry wadsworth longfellow?

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's The Divine Comedy and was one of the five Fireside Poets.

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Famous quotes containing the words wadsworth longfellow, henry, wadsworth and/or longfellow:

    Morality without religion is only a kind of dead reckoning—an endeavor to find our place on a cloudy sea by measuring the distance we have run, but without any observation of the heavenly bodies.
    —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882)

    Yes, dance. Dance and dream. Dream that you’re Mrs. Henry Jekyll of Harley Street, dancing with your own butler and six footmen. Dream that they’ve all turned into white mice and crawled into an eternal pumpkin.
    John Lee Mahin (1902–1984)

    There the wrinkled old Nokomis
    Nursed the little Hiawatha,
    Rocked him in his linden cradle,
    Bedded softin moss and rushes,
    —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809–1882)

    It whispered to the fields of corn,
    “Bow down, and hail the coming morn.”

    It shouted through the belfry tower,
    “Awake, O bell! proclaim the hour.”

    It crossed the churchyard with a sigh,
    And said, “Not yet! in quiet lie.”
    —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1809–1882)