Conversion To Christianity - Methods and Procedures Vary

Methods and Procedures Vary

The exact understanding of what it means to convert varies somewhat among denominations. The procedure for conversion itself depends on the sponsoring denomination and hinges on meeting the ritual and substantive requirements for such conversion. A person converting to Christianity often chooses to experience baptism as a sign of their conversion. It is required by some churches and denominations as a prerequisite to membership.

Conversion is generally understood to be undertaken by a person who explicitly chooses to convert. In some denominations, this may include any person above the age of reason (typically between seven and 14 years of age, according to denomination). The official reception is usually preceded by a period of instruction in the faith.

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