Compound

Compound may refer to:

  • Chemical compounds, combinations of two or more elements
  • Compound (enclosure), a cluster of buildings having a shared purpose, usually inside a fence or wall
  • Compound (fortification), a version of the above fortified with defensive structures
  • Compound bow, a type of bow for archery
  • Compound (linguistics), a word that consists of more than one radical element
  • Compound (migrant labour), a hostel for migrant workers such as those historically connected with mines in South Africa
  • Compound (music), an attribute of an interval or time signature
  • Compounding, the mixing of drugs in pharmacy
  • Polyhedral compound, a polyhedron composed of multiple polyhedra sharing the same centre of attention

Compound may also refer to:

  • Compound chocolate, a chocolate substitute
  • Compound fracture, complete fractures of bone where at least one fragment has damaged the skin, soft tissue or surrounding body cavity
  • Compound interest, unpaid interest that is added to the principal so that subsequent interest is calculated on the grossed amount
  • Compound engine, a steam engine in which steam is expanded through a series of two or three cylinders before exhaust.
  • Turbo-compound engine, an internal combustion engine where exhaust gases expand through power-turbines
  • Compound sentence (linguistics), a type of sentence made up of two or more independent clauses and no subordinate (dependent) clauses
  • Compound, a former US automobile make with a unique compound gasoline engine; exhausts of 2 cylinders were expanded in a larger third one.

Famous quotes containing the word compound:

    Put God in your debt. Every stroke shall be repaid. The longer the payment is withholden, the better for you; for compound interest on compound interest is the rate and usage of this exchequer.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    We are all aware that speech, like chemistry, has a structure. There is a limited set of elements—vowels and consonants—and these are combined to produce words which, in turn, compound into sentences.
    Roger Brown (b. 1925)

    He tries by a peculiar speech to speak
    The peculiar potency of the general,
    To compound the imagination’s Latin with
    The lingua franca et jocundissima.
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)