Christianity Today - History

History

The first issue of Christianity Today was mailed October 15, 1956, and the opening editorial, Why 'Christianity Today'?, stated "Christianity Today has its origin in a deep-felt desire to express historical Christianity to the present generation. Neglected, slighted, misrepresented—evangelical Christianity needs a clear voice, to speak with conviction and love, and to state its true position and its relevance to the world crisis. A generation has grown up unaware of the basic truths of the Christian faith taught in the Scriptures and expressed in the creeds of the historic evangelical churches."

Its first editor was Carl F. H. Henry. Notable contributors in its first two decades included contributions from F. F. Bruce, Edward John Carnell, Frank Gaebelein, Walter Martin, John Warwick Montgomery, and Harold Lindsell. Lindsell succeeded Henry as editor and during his editorial administration much attention centered on debates about biblical inerrancy. Later editorial work came from Kenneth Kantzer and Terry Muck. Notable current writers include author Philip Yancey, Fuller Theological Seminary's Richard Mouw, Yale Law professor Stephen Carter, and Prison Fellowship's Charles W. Colson. The current Editor in Chief is David Neff and Senior Managing Editor is Mark Galli. Contents include feature stories, news ranging from cultural issues from a Christian viewpoint to the global church, opinion, reviews, and investigative reporting.

In Billy Graham’s 1997 autobiography, 'Just As I Am,' he writes of his vision, idea, and history with Christianity Today.

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