California Mental Health Services Act

California Mental Health Services Act

On November 2004, voters in the U.S. state of California passed Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA), which has been designed to expand and transform California’s county mental health service systems. The MHSA is funded by imposing an additional one percent tax on individual, but not corporate, taxable income in excess of one million dollars. In becoming law on January 2005, the MHSA represents the latest in a Californian legislative movement, begun in the 1990s, to provide better coordinated and more comprehensive care to those with serious mental illness, particularly in underserved populations. Its successes thus far, such as with the development of innovative and integrated Full Service Partnerships (FSPs), are not without detractors who highlight the continued challenges MHSA implementation must overcome to fulfill the law's widely touted potential.

Read more about California Mental Health Services Act:  Background, Overview, Implementation, Roles & Responsibilities, Current Progress, Continued Challenges

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