Baggage Claim - Efficiency of Baggage Claim Units

Efficiency of Baggage Claim Units

The efficiency of baggage claim units can be measured in a number of ways including the amount of time a unit is in use for a given flight or the amount of baggage a unit can hold. A number of factors can independently affect the efficiency of a particular unit:

  • Aircraft seating capacity
  • Proportion of passengers with checked luggage
  • Proportion of passengers who are terminating at a given destination
  • Average number of luggage pieces per passenger
  • Average traveling party size
  • Average number of people at baggage claim
  • Average rate at which luggage are unloaded from the flight (this also depends on the physical properties of checked luggage)

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