Main

Main may refer to:

  • Main (river), a major river and tributary of the Rhine in Germany
  • Main River (Chukotka), a river in Far Eastern Siberia
  • Main River, an unincorporated community in Weldford Parish, New Brunswick, Canada
  • Main River (Newfoundland), a river in Newfoundland, Canada
  • Main (Northern Ireland), a river in Northern Ireland as seen at Map of Northern Ireland near the town of Ballymena
  • Saint Laurent Boulevard, a street in Montreal, Quebec, Canada is known as "The Main"
  • Spanish Main, a name given to the Caribbean coast
  • Main Street, a generic street name
  • Main (lunar crater), a crater on the moon
  • Main function (programming), a common function in some programming languages
  • Main (surname), people with the surname Main
  • Main (band), experimental musicians
  • Ma'in, alternate spelling for the Minaeans, an ancient people of modern-day Yemen during the 1st millennium BC
  • Water main
  • Main course
  • Gas main
  • Chas. T. Main, an engineering company, later bought by Parsons Corporation
  • main as a synonym for the ocean, as in the song "Sailing, Sailing"
  • Mountain Area Information Network, an Internet service provider and web hosting service and operator of WPVM-LP (MAIN-FM) Asheville, North Carolina, USA

Famous quotes containing the word main:

    The main reason why men and women make different aesthetic judgments is the fact that the latter, generally incapable of abstraction, only admire what meets their complete approval.
    Franz Grillparzer (1791–1872)

    Women are taught that their main goal in life is to serve others—first men, and later, children. This prescription leads to enormous problems, for it is supposed to be carried out as if women did not have needs of their own, as if one could serve others without simultaneously attending to one’s own interests and desires. Carried to its “perfection,” it produces the martyr syndrome or the smothering wife and mother.
    Jean Baker Miller (20th century)

    The three main medieval points of view regarding universals are designated by historians as realism, conceptualism, and nominalism. Essentially these same three doctrines reappear in twentieth-century surveys of the philosophy of mathematics under the new names logicism, intuitionism, and formalism.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)