Anthology

An anthology is a collection of literary works chosen by the compiler. It may be a collection of poems, short stories, plays, songs, or excerpts. In genre fiction anthology is used to categorize collections of shorter works such as short stories and short novels, usually collected into a single volume for publication.

The word derives from the 17th century Greek word, ανθολογία (anthologia : “a collection of flowers”), a reference to one of the earliest known anthologies, the Garland (Στέφανος), the introduction to which compares each of its anthologized poets to a flower. That Garland by Meléagros of Gadara formed the kernel for what has become known as the Greek Anthology. Florilegium, a Latin derivative for a collection of flowers, was used in medieval Europe for an anthology of Latin proverbs and textual excerpts. Shortly before anthology had entered the language, English had begun using "miscellany" as a word for such a collection.

The complete collections of works are often called Complete Works or Opera Omnia (Latin language equivalent).

Read more about Anthology:  Media, Traditional, Twentieth Century

Famous quotes containing the word anthology:

    For him nor deep nor hill there is,
    But all’s one level plain he hunts for flowers.
    —Unknown. The Thousand and One Nights.

    AWP. Anthology of World Poetry, An. Mark Van Doren, ed. (Rev. and enl. Ed., 1936)

    I passed a tomb among green shades
    Where seven anemones with down-dropped heads
    Wept tears of dew upon the stone beneath.
    —Unknown. The Thousand and One Nights.

    AWP. Anthology of World Poetry, An. Mark Van Doren, ed. (Rev. and enl. Ed., 1936)

    I please
    To plant some more dew-wet anemones
    That they may weep.
    —Unknown. The Thousand and One Nights.

    AWP. Anthology of World Poetry, An. Mark Van Doren, ed. (Rev. and enl. Ed., 1936)