Sense

Sense

Senses are physiological capacities of organisms that provide data for perception. The senses and their operation, classification, and theory are overlapping topics studied by a variety of fields, most notably neuroscience, cognitive psychology (or cognitive science), and philosophy of perception. The nervous system has a specific sensory system or organ, dedicated to each sense.

Human beings have a multitude of senses. Sight (ophthalmoception), hearing (audioception), taste (gustaoception), smell (olfacoception or olfacception), and touch (tactioception) are the five traditionally recognized. Whilst the ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by the traditional senses exists, including temperature (thermoception), kinesthetic sense (proprioception), pain (nociception), balance (equilibrioception), acceleration (kinesthesioception), and various internal stimuli (e.g. the different chemoreceptors for detecting salt and carbon dioxide concentrations in the blood), only a small number of these can safely be classified as separate senses in and of themselves. What constitutes a sense is a matter of some debate, leading to difficulties in defining what exactly a sense is.

Animals also have receptors to sense the world around them, with degrees of capability varying greatly between species. Humans have a comparatively weak sense of smell, whilst some animals may lack one or more of the traditional five senses. Some animals may also intake and interpret sensory stimuli in very different ways. Some species of animals are able to sense the world in a way that humans cannot, with some species able to sense electrical and magnetic fields, and detect water pressure and currents.

Read more about Sense:  Definition, Culture

Other articles related to "sense":

Optical Scan Voting System - History
... While mark sense technology dates back to the 1930s and optical mark recognition dates to the 1950s, these technologies were first explored in the context of standardized tests such as college entrance exams ... The first suggestion to use mark sense technology to count ballots came in 1953, but practical optical scanners did not emerge until the 1960s ... The Votronic, from 1965, was the first optical mark vote tabulator able to sense marks made with a graphite pencil ...
Mother's Boy
... man is seen to give control of his own life to his mother, in exchange for a sense of security ... in recent years, some have begun using the term in a milder sense, merely meaning a man who is emotionally attached to his mother ... Though this sense of the phrase is still uncommon compared to the original pejorative intent, mothers in particular may state their pride in their "mama's boy" sons ...
Cadence (music)
... Latin cadentia, "a falling") is, "a melodic or harmonic configuration that creates a sense of repose or resolution." A harmonic cadence is a progression of (at least ... A cadence is labeled more or less "weak" or "strong" depending on the sense of finality it creates ... not necessarily constitute a cadence—there must be a sense of closure, as at the end of a phrase ...
Anava
... an atom or an exceedingly small entity) is a state - the consciousness of the ego, the sense of "I" and "mine" ... This represents a sense of individuality and a separation from a general existence of any "divine plan" ... cause of the individual soul's mistaken sense of separate identity from Universal God Siva, and the last bond broken before union or Self-Realization (mok ...
Klaas De Vries (composer) - The Opera A King, Riding - Compositional Techniques
... The work has a fundamental chord which works as a building block in harmonic sense for the entire work ... In melodic sense A King, Riding works with a basic melodic curve, and gets altered throughout the piece ... In rhythmic sense we can find a lot of proportional values (Zuidam 40) ...

Famous quotes containing the word sense:

    Until you have a son of your own . . . you will never know the joy, the love beyond feeling that resonates in the heart of a father as he looks upon his son. You will never know the sense of honor that makes a man want to be more than he is and to pass something good and hopeful into the hands of his son. And you will never know the heartbreak of the fathers who are haunted by the personal demons that keep them from being the men they want their sons to be.
    Kent Nerburn (20th century)

    Anyone, however, who has had dealings with dates knows that they are worse than elusive, they are perverse. Events do not happen at the right time, nor in their proper sequence. That sense of harmony with place and season which is so stong in the historian—if he be a readable historian—is lamentably lacking in history, which takes no pains to verify his most convincing statements.
    Agnes Repplier (1858–1950)

    Nothing spoils a romance so much as a sense of humour in the woman.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)