Scale Degree

Some articles on scale degrees, scale degree, scale, degree:

Consecutive Fifths - Related Progressions - Hidden Consecutives
... Horn fifths occur when the upper voice is on the first three scale degrees ... Begin with the upper instrument on the third scale degree and the lower instrument on the tonic ... Then move the upper instrument to the second scale degree and the second instrument down to the fifth of the chord ...
Avoid Note
... In jazz theory, an avoid note is a scale degree considered especially dissonant relative to the harmony implied by the root chord, and is thus better avoided ... In major-key tonality the avoid note is the fourth diatonic scale step, or 11th, which is a minor ninth above the 3rd of the chord, and thus very harsh ... In melody it is usually avoided, treated as a "scale approach note" or passing note, or sharpened ...
Submediant
... In music, the submediant is the sixth scale degree of the diatonic scale, the 'lower mediant' halfway between the tonic and the subdominant or 'lower dominant' ... For example, in the C major scale (white keys on a piano, starting on C), the submediant is the note A and the submediant chord is A-minor consisting of the notes A, C, and E ... Therefore, Am is the vi chord in the C major scale ...
Tri-tone - Historical Uses
... system, which made B♭ a diatonic note, namely as the fourth degree of the hexachord on F ... For instance, in the tritone B–F, B would be "mi", that is the third scale degree in the "hard" hexachord beginning on G, while F would be "fa", that is the ... which together add up to a tritone) appears on the second scale degree, and thus features prominently in the progression iio-V-i ...

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