Degree

Degree may refer to:

Read more about Degree:  As A Unit of Measurement, In Mathematics, In Education, Other Measures, Other Uses

Other articles related to "degree, degrees":

Aleksander Kwaśniewski - 1995–2005: Presidency - Degree
... In his candidate for presidency statement Kwaśniewski declared that he had graduated university studies ... Actually he had never written his master thesis, nor passed the university final exams and therefore had no master degree ...
Education In Sweden - Higher Education - Advanced Level (avancerad Nivå)
... level, a student must have obtained a 3-year Swedish degree at the basic level or a corresponding degree from another country or some corresponding qualification ... The degrees that can be obtained at the advanced level are Degree of Master (One year) (magisterexamen), 1 year, 60 higher education credits Degree of Master (Two years) (masterexamen), 2 years, 120 higher ... The Degree of Master (Two years), masterexamen, is a new degree that is intended to be closely linked to continuing education at the graduate level ...
Yamashita Yoshiaki - Early Years
... He advanced to first degree black belt (shodan) rank in three months, fourth degree (yondan) ranking in two years, and sixth degree (rokudan) in ...
Elliott Wave Principle - Degree
... themselves underlie self-similar wave structures of increasing size or higher degree ... This signals that the movement of the wave one degree higher is upward ... unfold according to the five and three-wave structure which it underlies one degree higher ...
Vladimir May-Mayevsky - Honors
... Stanislaus 3rd degree, 1900 Order of St ... Anne 3rd degree 1904 Order of St ... Stanislaus 2nd degree, 1906 Order of St ...

Famous quotes containing the word degree:

    Words are made for a certain exactness of thought, as tears are for a certain degree of pain. What is least distinct cannot be named; what is clearest is unutterable.
    René Daumal (1908–1944)

    Men commonly couple with their idea of marriage a slight degree at least of sensuality; but every lover, the world over, believes in its inconceivable purity.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Essential truth, the truth of the intellectualists, the truth with no one thinking it, is like the coat that fits tho no one has ever tried it on, like the music that no ear has listened to. It is less real, not more real, than the verified article; and to attribute a superior degree of glory to it seems little more than a piece of perverse abstraction-worship.
    William James (1842–1910)