Degree

Degree may refer to:

Read more about Degree:  As A Unit of Measurement, In Mathematics, In Education, Other Measures, Other Uses

Other articles related to "degree, degrees":

Yamashita Yoshiaki - Early Years
... He advanced to first degree black belt (shodan) rank in three months, fourth degree (yondan) ranking in two years, and sixth degree (rokudan) in fourteen years ...
Vladimir May-Mayevsky - Honors
... Stanislaus 3rd degree, 1900 Order of St ... Anne 3rd degree 1904 Order of St ... Stanislaus 2nd degree, 1906 Order of St ...
Education In Sweden - Higher Education - Advanced Level (avancerad Nivå)
... a student must have obtained a 3-year Swedish degree at the basic level or a corresponding degree from another country or some corresponding qualification ... The degrees that can be obtained at the advanced level are Degree of Master (One year) (magisterexamen), 1 year, 60 higher education credits Degree of Master (Two years) (masterexamen), 2 ... The Degree of Master (Two years), masterexamen, is a new degree that is intended to be closely linked to continuing education at the graduate level ...
Elliott Wave Principle - Degree
... underlie self-similar wave structures of increasing size or higher degree ... This signals that the movement of the wave one degree higher is upward ... structure which it underlies one degree higher ...
Aleksander Kwaśniewski - 1995–2005: Presidency - Degree
... In his candidate for presidency statement Kwaśniewski declared that he had graduated university studies ... Actually he had never written his master thesis, nor passed the university final exams and therefore had no master degree ...

Famous quotes containing the word degree:

    I never saw, heard, nor read, that the clergy were beloved in any nation where Christianity was the religion of the country. Nothing can render them popular, but some degree of persecution.
    Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)

    In considering the ledger equal, understand the greatest gift you have given your parents is the opportunity to raise you. The things a child gets from parents can’t compare to the things a parent gets from raising a child. Only by experiencing this can you understand the degree to which children give meaning to parents’ lives.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)

    There is always a degree of ridicule that attends a disappointment, though often very unjustly, if the expectation was reasonably grounded; however, it is certainly most prudent not to communicate, prematurely, one’s hopes or one’s fears.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)