Research - Historical Method

Historical Method

The historical method comprises the techniques and guidelines by which historians use historical sources and other evidence to research and then to write history. There are various history guidelines commonly used by historians in their work, under the headings of external criticism, internal criticism, and synthesis. This includes lower criticism and sensual criticism. Though items may vary depending on the subject matter and researcher, the following concepts are part of most formal historical research:

  • Identification of origin date
  • Evidence of localization
  • Recognition of authorship
  • Analysis of data
  • Identification of integrity
  • Attribution of credibility

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Other articles related to "historical method, historical, method":

Muqaddimah - Historiography - Historical Method
... that the cultural difference of another age must govern the evaluation of relevant historical material, to distinguish the principles according to which it might be possible to attempt the evaluation, and lastly, to ... and uncritical acceptance of historical data." As a result, he introduced a scientific method to the study of history, which was considered something "new ... His historical method also laid the groundwork for the observation of the role of state, communication, propaganda and systematic bias in history, and he is thus considered to be the "fa ...
History Of The Peloponnesian War - Historical Method - Rationalization of Myth
... However, despite Thucydides' lack of trust in information that was not experienced firsthand, such as Homer's, he does use the poet's epics to infer facts about the Trojan War ... For instance, while Thucydides considered the number of over 1,000 Greek ships sent to Troy to be a poetic exaggeration, he uses Homer's catalog of ships to determine the approximate number of Greek soldiers who were present ...

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