Price Equation

The Price equation (also known as Price's equation or Price's theorem) is a covariance equation which is a mathematical description of evolution and natural selection. The Price equation was derived by George R. Price, working in London to re-derive W.D. Hamilton's work on kin selection. The Price equation also has applications in economics.

Price's equation is a theorem; it is a statement of mathematical fact between certain variables, and its value lies in the insight gained by assigning certain values encountered in evolutionary genetics to the variables. It provides us a way to understand the effects that gene transmission and natural selection have on the proportion of genes within each new generation of a population.

Read more about Price EquationStatement, Proof of The Price Equation, Simple Price Equation, Full Price Equation, Criticism On The Use of The Price Equation, Cultural References

Other articles related to "price equation, price, equation":

Price Equation - Cultural References
... Price's equation features in the plot and title of the 2008 thriller film WΔZ (http//www.imdb.com/title/tt0804552) ...
Group Selection - Overview
... The Price equation can partition variance caused by natural selection at the individual level and the group level, and individual level selection generally causes greater effects ... (2012) in their article "Group selection and inclusive fitness are not equivalent the Price equation vs ... models and statistics," suggest that the use of the Price equation to support group selection is based on certain mathematical assumptions that are invalid ...
Gene-centered View Of Evolution - Price Equation
... The Price equation (also known as Price's equation) is a covariance equation which is a mathematical description of evolution and natural selection ... The Price equation was derived by George R ... Price, working in London to rederive W ...

Famous quotes containing the words equation and/or price:

    A nation fights well in proportion to the amount of men and materials it has. And the other equation is that the individual soldier in that army is a more effective soldier the poorer his standard of living has been in the past.
    Norman Mailer (b. 1923)

    I have asked a lot of my emotions—one hundred and twenty stories. The price was high, right up with Kipling, because there was one little drop of something, not blood, not a tear, not my seed, but me more intimately than these, in every story, it was the extra I had. Now it has gone and I am just like you now.
    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)